Tulane Law School
About Admission & Financial Aid Student Life Programs Faculty Library Employers & Careers Life After Law School News
home
Tulane Law School
  News   
 

News releases concerning Tulane Law School, its faculty, staff, students, and programs are posted here.  For more information, please send an email to lawcommunications@tulane.edu.

 
 
Constitution Day at Tulane Law: An election focus on Sept. 16

September 12, 2016

Constitution Day 2016

 

The 2016 presidential election has put the U.S. Constitution front and center in both obvious and subtle ways that go well beyond the very process the document specifies for citizens to choose a new executive every four years.

Topics raised on the campaign trail have run the gamut of constitutional guarantees. Religious tests for citizenship. The extent of free-speech rights. Gun control. Police powers. The scope of presidential authority. Equal protection regardless of race, color or creed. Even whether to amend the Constitution itself.

To celebrate Constitution Day, Tulane Law School will examine “The Constitution and the Election” Sept. 16 at 11:30 a.m. in John Giffen Weinmann Hall Room 157. The event is free and open to the public.

Saru Matambanadzo, Moise S. Steeg Jr. Associate Professor of Law, will moderate a panel of constitutional scholars nationally recognized for their expertise:

Stephen Griffin, W.R. Irby Chair and Rutledge C. Clement Jr. Professor in Constitutional Law

Catherine Hancock, Geoffrey C. Bible & Murray H. Bring Professor of Constitutional Law

Keith Werhan, Ashton Phelps Chair of Constitutional Law

They’ll address some of the most-urgent questions raised during the campaign, including:

— How might the election affect the composition and work of the Supreme Court, as well as constitutional jurisprudence?

— What are the chances the election will alleviate what many see as a dysfunctional constitutional system?

— How does this year’s campaign rhetoric about the Supreme Court and the Constitution compare to the rhetoric of earlier eras?

The panel also will discuss questions from the audience.  

Constitution Day celebrates Sept. 17, 1787, the day that 39 delegates to the Constitutional Convention signed the U.S. Constitution, the most influential document in the nation’s history. 

 

 
   


Tulane Lawyer Magazine  



ABA REQUIRED DISCLOSURES CONTACT TLS INTRANET CALENDAR SEARCH:
 
©Tulane University Law School | Weinmann Hall | 6329 Freret Street | New Orleans, LA 70118 | 504.865.5939    Privacy Policy
Tulane University Home
 
 
admin login